25. March 2013 · Comments Off on Choose Anti-Racism · Categories: Media, Paul Berger, Social Justice

Neutrality and racism: What can journalists do?

“All writers are propagandists,” wrote environmentalist Derrick Jensen — all have a position and a message. That might seem obvious for book authors, but don’t we expect more from journalists? Shouldn’t the media be unbiased? Neutral? Objective? Balanced?

I am a community member concerned about social justice, environmental degradation, and the fair treatment of aboriginal people. I’m interested in the media’s roles and responsibilities in these areas, since much of our knowledge comes through the media and our opinions are often informed by what we see, hear and read. More »

01. February 2013 · Comments Off on Ecocidal behaviour · Categories: Activism, Scott Harris, Social Justice

Thank you to the aboriginal community, especially the young leaders of the local Idle No More movement who spoke so eloquently at the City Hall rally Monday. At the moment, you seem to be our best hope for slowing the Harper agenda.

As spokesperson Joyce Hunter and many others have documented, Prime Minister Harper is hell-bent on being the leader of a fossil-fuel superpower, and doesn’t care what it takes to realize such a misguided dream. More »

23. December 2012 · Comments Off on We’re all Treaty People · Categories: Activism, Peter Lang, Social Justice

Two eagles circled in a cold, sunny, winter-solstice sky, high above the Idle No More rally at Spirit Garden, Thunder Bay. This is true. At the same time a young Aboriginal speaker was telling us that, “We’re all treaty people”. I had never considered it. Yet, if you reason that the treaties were signed between aboriginal and non-aboriginal peoples – indeed, we are all treaty people. Accordingly, should we not accept that together we’re all responsible to maintain the spirit and intent of the treaties? More »

08. June 2012 · Comments Off on Grassy Narrows and the Tragedy of Joe Oliver · Categories: Democracy Undermined, Economic Policy, Fouling the Earth, Peter Globensky, Social Justice

Forty years ago I had the privilege of working with and securing financial resources for First Nation representatives and civil society organizations seeking redress from Dryden (REED) Pulp and Paper for the suffering inflicted on the residents of Grassy Narrows and White Dog First Nations and the destruction of an important life-sustaining ecosystem. Over an eight year period beginning in 1962 and without the benefit of environmental regulation, the company dumped nearly ten tons of methyl mercury, a lethal neurotoxin, into the Wabigoon River system. More »