11. July 2016 · Comments Off on Brexit, Trump offer lessons for climate change policy · Categories: Climate Crisis, Climate Policy, Economic Policy, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean, Pipelines-Tarsands, Transformative Ideas

First Posted: Monday, July 11, 2016
BY JASON MACLEAN

SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS

People are sick of experts, evidently. Facts, too, are becoming troublingly unpopular. Brexit and the popularity of U.S. presidential candidate Donald J. Trump are cases in point. A closer look at each offers lessons for the design of an effective and democratically accountable climate change policy.
First, Brexit. Experts hated it. In a poll of 639 British economists, 88 per cent predicted that a vote to leave the EU would decrease economic growth and efficiency. 52 per cent of voters opted to leave anyway.
Why? A revealing geographic analysis of the referendum conducted by the Resolution Foundation found that the parts of Britain most supportive of Brexit were the parts that have historically been the poorest, particularly in the north. Brexit supporters didn’t share the experts’ obsession with economic efficiency. They care more about economic equality. About the affordable houses that aren’t being built. About the good, secure jobs that aren’t being created.
Whether they’re right or wrong is beside the point. Neoliberal globalization has left many in Britain (and elsewhere) feeling alienated, dispossessed and voiceless. Hence the highly effective slogan “vote leave, take back control.” The Brexit plebiscite was the plebs’ chance to make themselves heard. And now the experts are scrambling to figure out what comes next, both in Britain and the EU. Only 38 per cent of the French, for example, view the EU favourably. Alors, Frexit? What about Scotland? Sexit? More »

16. May 2016 · Comments Off on What’s the Plan? For Canada’s climate change policy, it’s a leap either way you look · Categories: Climate Crisis, Climate Policy, Economic Policy, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean, Pipelines-Tarsands, Transformative Ideas

“Forget about what you are escaping from,” the illusionist Harry Houdini used to say. “Reserve your anxiety for what you are escaping to.” When it comes to Canada’s climate change policy, that’s wise counsel. Because whether you look to the left or to the right, it’s a leap either way.

Let’s start with the left, the already infamous Leap Manifesto.

Seldom has a four-page document loosely stringing together a series of disparate ideas—none original or genuinely controversial—generated so much handwringing.

What do the Leapers want? They call for Canada to generate 100% of its energy from renewable resources within 20 years, which is scientifically feasible; an end to fossil fuels subsidies, new oil pipelines, and other fossilized infrastructure investments; no more trade deals that compromise our ability to protect the environment; a universal guaranteed minimum income; recognition and enforcement of existing treaties with Indigenous peoples; and an expansion of low-carbon sectors of the economy, including caregiving, teaching, the arts, and public-interest media.

Above all, the Leapers demand the transition to a low-carbon future begin now. More »

25. April 2016 · Comments Off on Want to fix the climate? Fix the corruption of expertise first · Categories: Climate Crisis, Climate Policy, Democracy Undermined, Economic Policy, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean, Pipelines-Tarsands

Firs published in the Chronicle Journal Monday April 25, 2016
by Jason MacLean

After the US Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizen United, the corrupting influence of money in politics was supposed to be an exceptionally American problem. But it turns out that it’s very much a Canadian problem, too. Worse still, the corruption of money in politics is trumped by the corruption of expertise. Worst of all, the corruption of expertise is at the root of every important public policy issue, including climate change. More »

03. March 2016 · Comments Off on The Challenge of Ontario’s New Cap and Trade Regime · Categories: Climate Crisis, Climate Policy, Economic Policy, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean

First Published in the Toronto Star March 3, 2016

by Jason MacLean

The Ontario government has unveiled its long-awaited cap-and-trade regime. Meanwhile, the federal government is in the early days of establishing its pan-Canadian climate strategy featuring a minimum national carbon price of $15 per tonne. Will these policies help Canada meet its commitments under the Paris climate change agreement to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels?

It depends. More »

07. February 2016 · Comments Off on How to Evaluate Energy East? Try Evidence · Categories: Climate Crisis, Climate Policy, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean, Pipelines-Tarsands

First published in the Toronto Star Feb 7 2016
By Jason MacLean
Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna and Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr recently announced new interim regulations for oil pipeline projects currently under review by the National Energy Board, including Trans Mountain and Energy East.

The new regulations stipulate that oil pipeline decisions will be based on science and traditional Indigenous knowledge; the views of the public, including affected communities and Indigenous peoples; and the direct and upstream greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that can be linked to pipelines.

During their press conference announcing the new regulations, Ministers McKenna and Carr repeatedly intoned that “Canada needs to get its natural resources to market in a sustainable way.”

According to the ministers, this depends on restoring Canadians’ trust in the government’s regulatory processes. “We believe it is important and, in fact, essential to rebuild Canadians’ trust in our environmental assessment processes,” Minister McKenna said.

But therein lies the problem. More »

11. January 2016 · Comments Off on Fracking is a bridge to nowhere · Categories: Climate Crisis, Energy Policy, Fouling the Earth, Jason MacLean, Social Justice

SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS
First published in the Chronicle Journal Jan 11, 2016

BY JASON MACLEAN
For Canada and other parties to the recent Paris climate change agreement to meet their commitment to keep warming well below 2 degrees Celsius, “‘plan A’ must be to immediately and aggressively reduce GHG emissions.”
Why? Because there’s no plan B.
That’s not the cry of crazy environmentalists. That’s the cool-headed conclusion of a recent study in the journal Nature Climate Change entitled “Biophysical and economic limits to negative CO2 emissions” assessing the potential of what are called NETs (negative emissions technologies), which are designed to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. More »

First Posted Monday, December 21, 2015 in the Chronicle Journal
SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS
By Jason MacLean

Cultural critic Lauren Berlant defines cruel optimism as the desire for something that’s an obstacle to our flourishing. We fantasize about a “good life” — of enduring reciprocity in romantic couples, organizations, political systems — despite the evidence of their instability and diminishing returns.
The optimism about the recent Paris climate agreement is a cruel case in point.
According to the world’s leading science journal Nature, “the Paris agreement represents a bet on technological innovation and human ingenuity.”
Why? Because the agreement is a legal and scientific failure. More »

21. September 2015 · Comments Off on Corporate crime pays well, even when it’s punished · Categories: Activism, Climate Crisis, Climate Policy, Corporate Irresponsibility, Fouling the Earth, Jason MacLean

First Published in the Chronicle Journal Monday, September 21, 2015

SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS BY JASON MACLEAN
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Corporate crime pays. A lot. So does covering it up. Exhibit A: Healthcare giant Johnson and Johnson develops and markets a drug called Risperdal. Risperdal is a billion-dollar antipsychotic medicine that has both real benefits as well as some serious side effects.
For example, Risperdal increases the risk of strokes among the elderly, and can cause boys to develop breasts, a condition known as gynecomastia. One teenage boy developed a 46DD bust. More »

08. September 2015 · Comments Off on Like a bike – it’ll save you and the planet · Categories: Activism, Climate Crisis, Jason MacLean, Transformative Ideas

First Published in the Chronicle Journal Tuesday, September 8, 2015

SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS by Jason MacLean | 7 comments
Two years. Two years since I moved to Thunder Bay. Two years in Thunder Bay without a car. Or truck. Or monster truck.
How do I get around?
I bike (mostly). And forgive me for saying so, but so should you.
Some background: Every so often I give a public lecture on environmental law and sustainability, and the question I get most often is this: As an ordinary citizen, what can I do to help? More »

20. April 2015 · Comments Off on What is sustainability, anyway? · Categories: Activism, Climate Crisis, Jason MacLean, Transformative Ideas

First Published in the Chronicle Journal Monday, April 20, 2015

SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS
By Jason MacLean
Dear reader, I owe you an apology. I’ve been writing this column on sustainability for nearly two years now and I’ve yet to define what sustainability means, exactly.
A close friend who’s evidently not a regular reader of mine told me how interesting he found a recent column. But he quickly — if a little sheepishly — added that “sustainability” seems to be a bit of a buzz word that gets used in a number of different ways, not all of them reconcilable.
He’s not wrong. Not entirely, anyway. More »

23. March 2015 · Comments Off on We’re all ‘Under the Dome’ · Categories: Climate Crisis, Democracy Undermined, Jason MacLean, Uncategorized

First Published Monday, March 23, 2015
in
? Chronicle Journal Columns
SUSTAINABILITY MATTERS
By Jason MacLean
Thunder Bay
Have you watched Under the Dome yet? I’m not talking about the TV adaptation of Stephen King’s novel of the same name. I’m talking about the documentary released last month about China’s cataclysmic air pollution that generated more than 200 million views on Chinese websites within days of its release before the government ordered that it be removed from the Internet (you can watch it with English subtitles here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6X2uwlQGQM). More »

19. January 2015 · Comments Off on Gambling our future away? · Categories: Climate Policy, Economic Policy, Jason MacLean

Our elected leaders are compulsive gamblers, turns out. Crazy, right?

Let’s begin with the fact that the federal government has been bluffing since 2006 that it would introduce sector-by-sector regulations for greenhouse gas emissions, including Alberta’s tar sands, the fastest growing source of carbon pollution in Canada. More »

06. January 2015 · Comments Off on In 2015, let’s really talk about sustainability · Categories: Climate Crisis, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean, Pipelines-Tarsands

Let’s have a show of hands: how many of us have already reneged on one or more New Year’s resolutions?

You’re not alone. According to a study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, 45 per cent of us make New Year’s resolutions, but only 8 per cent of us actually succeed.

New Year’s resolutions, it turns out, are just another form of procrastination. Interested in losing weight and getting in shape? Spending more time with family and loved ones? Maybe learning something new? No matter the goal, the best approach, according to a spate of new scientific studies, is to ditch the resolution and just do it. Like, now.

We need to heed this advice on a national level when it comes to energy, the environment and sustainable development. Like, now. More »

22. December 2014 · Comments Off on Don’t frack with the facts, Prime Minister · Categories: Climate Crisis, Democracy Undermined, Energy Policy, Jason MacLean

By now you’ve probably heard about the historic Lima Accord — nearly 200 countries have agreed to agree to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of oil, gas and coal. Of course, it’s just a pledge at this point, with the final agreement to be reached next year in Paris. And even if a final agreement is reached, it won’t be legally binding. The Lima Accord doesn’t actually obligate countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by any particular amount, or at all. Rather, countries are encouraged to submit by March 2015 their plans — “Intended Nationally Determined Amounts” — setting out how much they will cut after the year 2020, and what domestic laws they will pass to achieve the cuts. If countries miss the March 2015 deadline, they get an extension until June 2015. And if they miss the June 2015 deadline, well, no one really cares. More »

24. November 2014 · Comments Off on Is the Canadian oil game rigged? · Categories: Corporate Irresponsibility, Democracy Undermined, Jason MacLean, Pipelines-Tarsands

“TransCanada plans to spend big, but project uncertainty looms,” read a recent headline in The Globe and Mail.

The newspaper went on to describe TransCanada as a “Calgary-based pipeline and power giant” and explained to those of us who choose to think about sunnier topics than the politics of oil pipelines that the projects in doubt include TransCanada’s proposed Keystone XL and Energy East pipelines.

But TransCanada apparently intends to do more than just spend big. According to documents prepared for TransCanada by Edelman, one of the world’s largest public relations firms, Edelman is advising TransCanada to “add layers of difficulty for our opponents, distracting them from their mission More »